Traditional recipes

Turmeric-Tahini Dressing

Turmeric-Tahini Dressing


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A spicy, creamy vibrant dressing that’s equally delicious on grain bowls and hearty salads, like kale.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk together tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, turmeric, cayenne, and ¼ cup water until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste.

  • DO AHEAD: Dressing can be made 4 days ahead. Cover and chill.

,Photos by Michael Graydon Nikole Herriott

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 45 Fat (g) 4.5 Saturated Fat (g) .5 Cholesterol (mg) 0 Carbohydrates (g) 1 Dietary Fiber (g) 0 Total Sugars (g) 0 Protein (g) 1 Sodium (mg) 0Reviews SectionI found an article named 'How to make the grain bowl of your lunchtime dreams.Dated Bon Appetit January 24, 2015 and it has the recipe of the grain bowl shown with the Spicy Turmeric Tahini dressing. I just found the recipe so haven't made it yet.KtorresAdelino, New Mexico 02/29/20What is the salad/grain bowl underneath? Cannot find the recipe anywhere!I had to add a bit of water to thin out the tahini, but I love this flavor combo--definitely yummy with the halloumi grain bowl as in the photo.sastriblingBergen County, NJ06/30/19Hey! havent made, but WHAT salad is this under the dressing? XOXOI used this recipe as a base for my own riff - I thought, as is, it might be a little plain. So I added (without measuring) the ingredients listed above to a food processor, plus some quickly roasted chopped garlic, ginger, and green onion whites; honey; and some apple cider vin (to tie into my dish), plus some water to thin. I think the added acidity of the ACV plus the sweetness of the honey really made a big difference. Super yummy!margaretabutcherPhiladelphia01/06/18

Turmeric-Tahini Dressing - Recipes

This vegan turmeric tahini dressing is the perfect way to incorporate turmeric into your diet regularly. Versatile and easy to make!

In many years of making many batches of tahini based dressing, this golden-hued turmeric tahini dressing is still an all time favorite.

The turmeric tahini dressing was inspired by the menu of the now bygone Jivamuktea Cafe . Jivamukti adjoined the yoga studio of the same name, and it was a wonderful, cozy place to seek out simple food and big cups of tea.

The Jivamukti menu featured many nourishing grain bowls, sandwiches, soups, and protein rich salads. I often used to go there with my friend Brendan, and every time we split lunch he’d order a spirulina millet dish with turmeric tahini dressing.

I love dressings and sauces, and I love turmeric. And I’m a tahini fanatic. So I wasn’t surprised when I tasted Brendan’s dish and loved the dressing. I was inspired to create my own version, and the turmeric tahini dressing I’ve been making since then has become a staple.


Turmeric Tahini Dressing

Remember last week when I said I was sort-of-kind-of declaring May the unofficial month of Turmeric? Wasn’t kidding.

I am always looking for new ways to get more turmeric in our diets and I spied a Turmeric Tahini Dressing on Bon Appetit last year. I started making it and kept tweaking the spices and ratios until I got it just right.

This version is so creamy, so completely dairy free and so ridiculously easy — it literally takes less than five minutes to make a batch. I use it on everything from hearty cooked greens, salad bowls, baked potatoes, steamed broccoli, on burgers and even as a dip for veggies!

Later this week I am going to share a Mediterranean Chicken Bowl that features this dressing. I am telling you the uses are endless.

One quick tip about spiciness. If you want this to be kid-friendly and on the mild side, make it as written. If you want to kick up the spice a bit, use 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper and substitute smoked paprika for the regular paprika.


Turmeric Tahini Dressing

I have been mixing turmeric in my smoothies lately. It has many health benefits, including reducing inflammation.

Since I love tahini dressing, I thought I would make a Turmeric Tahini Dressing. This savory dressing has a bit of a cheesy flavor from nutritional yeast. I also added red pepper flakes for a touch of spice. Add more if you want it really spicy.

Ever since I have been making dressings instead of buying them, I have been enjoying salads so much more. There is just something about a freshly made homemade dressing that you don't get from store bought.

They are not only easy to whip up, but they also taste fresh. They have ingredients that you can actually pronounce, and you know where those ingredients came from.

This Turmeric Tahini Dressing goes well with sweet and savory flavors. I've dressed veggie salads with it as well as one with sweet potato, dried cranberries, and pomegranate seeds. I've also added it to an avocado and berry salad, so it is really versatile.


Turmeric Tahini Loaded Chicken Salad

Packed with nourishing ingredients, Turmeric Tahini Loaded Chicken Salad is perfect for lunch at home or to make ahead and take on-the-go!

Do you have plans for lunch?

Allow me to introduce you to Turmeric Tahini Loaded Chicken Salad.

This powerhouse salad is packed with so much goodness, I really don’t know where to begin.

First, it’s loaded with protein-rich chicken plus all kinds of fiber-packed veggies to keep you full.

Then, there’s the creamy dressing that’s magically dairy-free.

The creaminess? It comes from tahini, a super yummy sesame paste that adds tons of richness to the mix.

Also, there’s a healthy dose of anti-inflammatory turmeric to make the whole thing a party.

The inspiration came from a salad similar at a cafe recently, and knew I had to recreate it for you guys.

Using the original recipe as a guide, I bumped up the veggies and added raisins for a touch of sweetness to balance the savory flavors in the rest of the salad.

You can use store-bought, rotisserie chicken to make prep super simple if you like, or use leftover chicken from dinner another night.

I personally like to make a double batch of this salad, and pack it in mason jars to take on-the-go throughout the week.

I hope you’ll try this one soon. Now, let’s make some Turmeric Tahini Loaded Chicken Salad!

Recipe & Kid Friendly Adaptations

1 | Serve the chicken and veggies separately on a plate, with the dressing on the side for dipping.

2 | For a vegetarian option, swap the chicken for 1-2 cans of drained and rinsed cans of chickpeas. Lightly smash half the chickpeas, then proceed with the recipe.

3 | Chopped green apple would also be a nice addition to this salad.

Tools + Ingredients to Make Turmeric Tahini Loaded Chicken Salad

This Recipe Is…

gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free, mayo-free, nut-free, grain-free, soy-free, paleo and whole30

Pin the Image Below To Save Turmeric Tahini Loaded Chicken Salad to Pinterest for Later!


The Macro Bowl with Turmeric-Tahini Dressing

Now, I’m usually the type of chick who makes her own lunch every day to ensure that I have a healthy, vegan meal but these last couple of weeks, I’ve been “forgetting” to pack my lunch which means I have to go out. Oh yeah- did I mention that my new office is right across the street from a Native Foods?

I would say the main reason for this “forgetfulness” has been the Sesame Kale Macro Bowl at Native Foods. It’s one of my favorite items on the menu. Besides being super delicious, it’s also very healthy and satisfying. It’s a simple dish: Brown rice, steamed kale, savory tempeh, sauerkraut, drizzled with a creamy tahini dressing and served with a small cucumber seaweed salad. And it really rocks my world.

My recent “forgetfulness” and the resulting increased consumption of macro bowls has led me to crave macro bowls all the time. Or maybe I’m craving the balanced, healthy feeling I have when I eat them. Whatever the case, I decided to develop my own macro bowl recipe.

According to macrobiotic rules, a macro bowl (or meal) should consist of 50% grains (carbo-phobes don’t be scared! Grains are good for us!), around 35% vegetables (bonus if that includes some leafy greens), roughly 10% legumes (beans of any sort will work but tofu and tempeh will also work because they are made from soy beans), some fermented vegetables, sea vegetables of some sort, and a creamy nut or seed-based dressing.

My bowl uses those guidelines but may not follow the ratios exactly to allow for a little more variety (that’s a fancy way of saying I like lots o’ stuff in my bowls). I start my macro bowl with some brown rice, and then add steamed kale and wakame (a type of seaweed), roasted sweet potatoes, cucumber “noodles” (though you can totally chop up your cucumber like a normal person if you want), chickpeas, avocado (because avocado belongs on everything), and pickled red cabbage. Over the top, I drizzled a bright, tangy turmeric-tahini dressing. Turmeric touts many health benefits (from anti-inflammatory to antioxidant and cancer prevention) so the dressing was just the icing on an already very healthy cake bowl.

So now I’m eating macro bowls all. the. time. I would even go as far as to say that it’s my current obsession (well, that and Sherlock). Judging by the huge response I got when I posted a picture of this bowl earlier this week, I think it would be fair to say that many of you are also in love with the macro bowl. Don’t worry- it’s okay if you want to “forget” your current lunch plans in favor of this delectable bowl.


Turmeric Tahini Dressing

In my recent video, I explained how this beautiful yellow spice has all kinds of awesome properties including positive effects on cholesterol and inflammatory markers.

And the best part – these benefits may be achieved with as little as one teaspoon a day.

Today I want to share with you a super easy, delicious, and nutritious recipe you can make to get in your daily dose – my tahini salad dressing with fermented turmeric.

This awesome powder delivers the health benefits of turmeric with the added bonus of being fermented with probiotics, which allows for better digestibility of nutrients. It’s also organic, non-GMO, gluten-free and vegan.

Here in Whit’s Kitch, I use turmeric on the regular for things like tofu scrambles, curries, golden milk, sauces, and dressings like this one.

  • 2 servings of Fermented Turmeric Booster Powder
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 2-3 tablespoons filtered water

I use this dressing on just about everything – kale salads, Buddha bowls, and roasted veggies. You name it – this makes it better.

It tastes great, looks pretty, and it’s great for you – check, check, check!

If you don’t like the taste of turmeric, however, or you’re interested in achieving some of the benefits that are associated with higher intakes of turmeric’s main active compound, curcumin, you have other options!

New Chapter’s Turmeric Force provides whole-food turmeric in a capsule form. Because it uses the whole turmeric root, Turmeric Force is complete with Curcumin and important compounds like Turmerones. Turmerones are the naturally occurring oils in Turmeric known to aid in the absorption of curcumin.

As I discussed in my previous post, therapeutic doses of curcumin have been shown to have many benefits.

If you’re interested, talk to your doctor about whether supplementation is a safe option for you.

Weigh in: Have you heard of the health benefits of turmeric? Will you try this turmeric tahini dressing?

*This post is sponsored by New Chapter but all opinions are my own. I thank you for your support of Whitney E. RD-approved partnerships that make this website possible.


Turmeric Tahini Dressing

In my recent video, I explained how this beautiful yellow spice has all kinds of awesome properties including positive effects on cholesterol and inflammatory markers.

And the best part – these benefits may be achieved with as little as one teaspoon a day.

Today I want to share with you a super easy, delicious, and nutritious recipe you can make to get in your daily dose – my tahini salad dressing with fermented turmeric.

This awesome powder delivers the health benefits of turmeric with the added bonus of being fermented with probiotics, which allows for better digestibility of nutrients. It’s also organic, non-GMO, gluten-free and vegan.

Here in Whit’s Kitch, I use turmeric on the regular for things like tofu scrambles, curries, golden milk, sauces, and dressings like this one.

  • 2 servings of Fermented Turmeric Booster Powder
  • 2 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • 2-3 tablespoons filtered water

I use this dressing on just about everything – kale salads, Buddha bowls, and roasted veggies. You name it – this makes it better.

It tastes great, looks pretty, and it’s great for you – check, check, check!

If you don’t like the taste of turmeric, however, or you’re interested in achieving some of the benefits that are associated with higher intakes of turmeric’s main active compound, curcumin, you have other options!

New Chapter’s Turmeric Force provides whole-food turmeric in a capsule form. Because it uses the whole turmeric root, Turmeric Force is complete with Curcumin and important compounds like Turmerones. Turmerones are the naturally occurring oils in Turmeric known to aid in the absorption of curcumin.

As I discussed in my previous post, therapeutic doses of curcumin have been shown to have many benefits.

If you’re interested, talk to your doctor about whether supplementation is a safe option for you.

Weigh in: Have you heard of the health benefits of turmeric? Will you try this turmeric tahini dressing?

*This post is sponsored by New Chapter but all opinions are my own. I thank you for your support of Whitney E. RD-approved partnerships that make this website possible.


How to make buddha bowls

  1. Preheat oven to 450 F. On a large sheet pan, add sweet potatoes, beets and chickpeas. Toss all ingredients with olive oil and season with salt. Rub chickpeas with chili powder then roast in oven for 20 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, add quinoa and water to a rice cooker or a pot on the stove and cook. Mix all ingredients for turmeric tahini dressing together in a food processor, Magic Bullet or blender.
  3. Chop kale so it's ready to go once the bowls are done cooking.
  4. Add all ingredients to the bowls, then top with tahini turmeric sauce. Serve and enjoy!

Ingredients and substitutions

  • olive oil – any neutral oil such as canola or sunflower oil will work here
  • sweet potato – butternut squash or acorn squash would be a good sub in, and you can also use regular potatoes
  • beets – sub in another root vegetable instead of the beets. Carrots and parsnips would be good options
  • chickpeas – any canned legume will work here, such as canned lentils, kidney beans, black beans, etc.
  • chili powder – you can leave this out
  • kale – you can feel free to use any type of greens you'd like, from spinach to Swiss chard
  • quinoa – rice or any other type of grain will work in this recipe, or you can just leave it out altogether and add another veggie to the sheet pan
  • avocado – you can leave this out if you don't have one on hand
  • tahini – sunflower butter or almond butter will work in place of the tahini
  • lemon juice – you need a little hit of something acidic in this dressing, so feel free to use white wine vinegar or apple cider vinegar if you don't have lemon juice. Lime juice would change the taste of the dressing but in a pinch you could use that too
  • turmeric – you can use fresh grated turmeric or dried turmeric, both work just as well. If you don't have turmeric, you can leave it out and the dressing will still taste good. Curry powder will change the flavour, but it would work as a sub in
  • garlic – try your best to use fresh minced or jarred garlic, but garlic powder will work in a pinch

Can buddha bowls have meat?

Technically, buddha bowls are about balancing the food you eat and trying to cram as many healthy ingredients into one bowl as possible. There is no one right or wrong way to make a bowl like this, and you are free to add meat or chicken if you'd like. Typically, most buddha bowls are vegetarian in order to keep things simple, but there are no rules here.

The name originated because for Buddha, food was supposed to be low key and not take over our lives. Hence the simplicity of the food in the bowl. At least, this history is according to Epicurious.

I say, it's your bowl and you add what you want to it! Here are some other protein ideas for these bowls:

Storing and reheating

You can store leftover assembled bowls in the fridge up to 5 days. I recommend storing the dressing separate, and keeping the avocado separate as well. For any sliced or open avocado, I add a bit of lemon juice to prevent it from browning. It's best if you only use the amount of avocado you need and try to preserve the rest or just not slice open the avocado until you go to eat the bowls.

You can reheat the bowls sans avocado for 1-2 minutes in the microwave. Yes, you can reheat the kale and dressing, just not the avocado.

Freezing the quinoa

Unfortunately, there aren't very many components of this bowl that you can freeze, but you can freeze the cooked quinoa for another time. Simply store in glass containers and defrost in the fridge when ready to use.

More Buddha bowl recipes

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Golden Summer Salad with Creamy Turmeric Tahini Dressing

Hello yellow. The sunny hue represents happiness, clarity and sunlight— and who’s to disagree? The bright golden shimmer of this salad is an instant mood lifter. The star here is the creamy vibrant dressing— luxurious and satisfying for both body and soul. The nuttiness of tahini, the acidity of lemon and that unmistakable heady magical glow of turmeric with its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties all come together to create some salad magic. Those jammy eggs, corn, tomatoes and potatoes practically beckon you the siren call of those South Fork idyllic summer nights, where friends, fireflies and a crisp glass of rose are all you need.

“They say you eat with your eyes, right? Well, let’s taste the rainbow, shall we? Summer is all about color— from bright, saturated hues of fresh corn and tomatoes to deep jewel tones of blackberries and plums. Throughout the season, the abundance of vibrant, fresh produce demands a simple, fuss-free approach— all the more to celebrate Mother Earth’s treasures— and practically speaking, who wants to spend time in the kitchen while there’s poolside fun to be had? The following salads draw inspiration from the array of summer hues that sweep over the land during these treasured warm months. So let’s celebrate summer and enjoy life— and healthy eating— in true living color.”

INGREDIENTS

2 eggs
2 ears of corn
3 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut half
2 head of endive, spears separated
1 cup yellow cherry tomatoes, halved
Dill fronds, for garnish
Olive oil, for finishing
Flaky sea salt

Dressing
¼ cup tahini
2 tbsp lemon juice (about half a lemon)
2-3 tbsp water
1 tbsp maple syrup
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp turmeric
¼ tsp cumin
¼ tsp cayenne pepper

METHOD

For dressing, combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth.

Place potatoes in a pot filled with cold water and bring to a boil. Lower to a rolling boil over medium heat and cook for 20-25 minutes or until easily pierced with the tip of a knife. Remove from pot and allow to cool. Cut into slices. Bring water back to a boil and in the same pot, boil eggs for 7 minutes exactly in boiling water then transfer to cold water to cool. Peel and halve.

To assemble, pour dressing onto a large platter and arrange potatoes, endive, tomatoes, eggs and corn on top. Drizzle with a glug of good olive oil and finish with flaky sea salt. Garnish with dill fronds.


Roasted Sweet Potato and Cauliflower Rice Buddha Bowls with Turmeric Tahini Dressing

Superfood cauliflower rice Buddha bowls with roasted sweet potato, kale, black beans, avocado, red onion, pumpkin seeds, and turmeric tahini dressing &ndash a high impact vegetarian meal to refuel your vitamin tank.

After travelling so much over the last couple of months, I feel like I need this exact bowl (or some rendition or semblance of it) on repeat. There&rsquos been fried food, gluten, dairy upon dairy, sugar upon sugar, cocktail upon cocktail, you guys, there&rsquos been CHEESE.

Not that I have regrets or complaints, because I think it&rsquos important to cut loose when I travel, and BOY GEORGE I&rsquove eaten some incredible food lately&hellipBUTT (<-get it?) the body has definitely seen better days. Both from an energy standpoint and a skinny-jeans-don&rsquot-lie-my-ass-has-its-own-gravitational-force sort of way. And let&rsquos face it, amp up the carbs and dumb down the vitamins, and this girl&rsquos inner emoji demons come raging out. Sensitive toothpaste right here.

Case in point: I, personally, could use an emotional cleanse as well as a physical reboot. This bowl is amazing for detoxifying after a perma-vaycay, or for general upkeep and maintenance. It&rsquos the type of bowl I eat regularly when I&rsquom home and have my own kitchen tools at my disposal. It&rsquos what I crave once I give myself the chance to press &ldquounsubscribe&rdquo from the addictive, addictive ways of brownies a la mode.

Breaking it down beat-boy style, we have roasted sweet potato to the kale to the tahini dressing, to the cauliflower rice to the black bean hallelujah. This bowl will be your high-intensity nutrient boost whenever you feel you need it. It&rsquos grain-free, vegan, and well-balanced. You can add to it, subtract from it, mix it up, have your way with it. Butternut squash in place of sweet potato? Get on with your bad self. Brown rice in place of cauliflower rice? You do you. Add some chicken or pulled pork? Sing it!

About that kale. I kept my kale raw in these bowls, but you can certainly give it a quick saute if you prefer a softer leaf/easier to chew experience. You can also rub the leaves with lemon juice and drizzle with olive oil and sea salt for a wilted kale experience. In essence, choose your path when it comes to the greenage. Prefer spinach? Make that swap!

Turmeric tahini dressing, people. Wow, what a nutrient-boosting sauce. We use lemon juice for some added antioxidants and flavor, fresh turmeric because it&rsquos an insane superfood, tahini because it&rsquos healthful and creamy, and nutritional yeast because: yum. The cool part about this dressing is you can definitely make it your own. Add more coconut milk to make it creamier, more lemon juice to give it more tang, amp up the nutritional yeast for more cheesy flavor, and/or omit any of the ingredients to suit your personal taste.

This meal serves 2 people super generously (with the probability of leftovers). You can gauge how many heads of cauliflower to use based on how many people you&rsquore feeding. Cauliflower cooks down quite a bit, so if you&rsquore feeding 2 people, 1 head is fine, but if you&rsquore serving 3 to 4 people, double the recipe so that no one is shorted on cauliflower rice.



Comments:

  1. Kijora

    there is something similar?

  2. Shashicage

    Thank you very much for your assistance in this matter. I did not know that.

  3. Lukas

    It is true! Great idea, I agree with you.

  4. Gallagher

    Is it still that?

  5. Loman

    It is possible to tell, this :) exception to the rules



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